Famous Poets collection of free poems and free poetry
Home| What's New| Search Poetry| About US| E-Mail Poem a day| Privacy Policy|
Category
  Children Poems
  Englands Poets
  Fathers/ Fathers day Poems
  Friendship Poems
  General Poems
  Graduation Poems
  Humerous/ Funny Poems
  In Memoriam
  Love Poems
  Mothers/ Mothers day Poems
  Mystical/ Mythology
  Nature Poems
  Poems of Hope
  Remembrance Poems
  Scottish
  Sonnets
  Spiritual/ Religious Poems
  Spring Poems
  Summer Poems
  Thought provoking/ sad Poems
  War Poems
  Wedding Poetry
  Winter Poems
  Top Viewed Poetry
  Top rated Poetry
  All Poets
  All Poems
  Poet of the Day
  Poem of the Day
  Links
  Site Map


 
Total Views:  1513  
        Rating:  0  
This Poetry has been rated 0 times  
 
Rate This Poem:      
  
Poem Title:  A Little Mistake

Poem Category:  Humerous/ Funny Poems

Poet:  Henry Lawson

Poet Biography: 
Henry Lawson (1867-1922) was an Australian writer and poet.



Poem: 
A Little Mistake

’Tis a yarn I heard of a new-chum ‘trap’
On the edge of the Never-Never,
Where the dead men lie and the black men lie,
And the bushman lies for ever.
’Twas the custom still with the local blacks
To cadge in the ‘altogether’—
They had less respect for our feelings then,
And more respect for the weather.

The trooper said to the sergeant’s wife:
‘Sure, I wouldn’t seem unpleasant;
‘But there’s women and childer about the place,
‘And—barrin’ a lady’s present—

‘There’s ould King Billy wid niver a stitch
‘For a month—may the drought cremate him!—
‘Bar the wan we put in his dirty head,
‘Where his old Queen Mary bate him.

‘God give her strength!—and a peaceful reign—
‘Though she flies in a bit av a passion
‘If ony wan hints that her shtoyle an’ luks
‘Are a trifle behind the fashion.

‘There’s two of the boys by the stable now—
‘Be the powers! I’ll teach the varmints
‘To come wid nought but a shirt apiece,
‘And wid dirt for their nayther garmints.

‘Howld on, ye blaggards! How dare ye dare
‘To come widin sight av the houses?—
‘I’ll give ye a warnin’ all for wance
‘An’ a couple of ould pair of trousers.’

They took the pants as a child a toy,
The constable’s words beguiling
A smile of something beside their joy;
And they took their departure smiling.

And that very day, when the sun was low,
Two blackfellows came to the station;
They were filled with the courage of Queensland rum
And bursting with indignation.

The constable noticed, with growing ire,
They’d apparently dressed in a hurry;
And their language that day, I am sorry to say,
Mostly consisted of ‘plurry.’

The constable heard, and he wished himself back
In the land of the bogs and the ditches—
‘You plurry big tight-britches p’liceman, what for
‘You gibbit our missuses britches?’

And this was a case, I am bound to confess,
Where civilisation went under;
Had one of the gins been less modest in dress
He’d never have made such a blunder.

And here let the moral be duly made known,
And hereafter signed and attested:
We should place more reliance on that which is shown
And less upon what is suggested.


Designed & Developed By Elitesofttech

Love Poems and Love Poetry | Funny Poems and Funny Poetry | Mothers Day Poems and Mothers Day Poetry | Fathers Day Poems and Fathers Day Poetry | Free Poems and Free Poetry | Famous Poems and Famous Poetry | Childrens/Teen Poems and Childrens/Teen Poetry | Wedding Poems and Wedding Poetry | War Poems and War Poetry | Sad Poems and Sad Poetry | Friendship Poems and Friendship Poetry | Graduation Poems and Graduation Poetry